Why Biking is All Sorts of Healthy

Last Monday I got a new bike, my first road bike, it’s so great.  I don’t have a picture of it yet but found a picture online that is very similar, it’s posted above, isn’t it pretty?  I love bikes for all sorts of reasons which relate to the ways in which bikes make you healthier.  The thing I like most about bikes is that they’re pretty much accessible to everyone.  Minneapolis has a plethora of used bike shops, including the Hub Bike Co-op which is my favorite and where I bought my new bike for $250.  Bikes that’ll get you around can be found on Craigslist.  My old roommate used a $20 bike from Craigslist to commute for years.  Minneapolis has the NiceRide system which allows you to rent bikes from kiosks all over the city for commuting and recreation and the fees are $55/year for students and $65/year for everyone else.  This means that for all of the reasons I’m about to discuss, biking is a feasible way to embody your attitude about sustainability, frugality, and heath.

Bikes save you money.  Mr. Money Mustache did a great job of discussing all of the potential and theoretical ways in which bikes could save you money, but I’m going to get a bit more realistic.  Let’s calculate the average amount of fuel burned and money spent for an average American commute in a year.  To do this we’ll have to Google some things:

  • In 2009, the EPA reported that the average fuel economy in America reached 22.4 mpg.
  • The average commute in America is 15 miles.
  • Gas was $3.56 per gallon on average in 2011.

Driving to work every weekday for a year (50 weeks, accounting for some vacation time) at 30 miles/day in a 22.4 mpg car will result in 7,500 miles driven, 335 gallons of gas burned, and $1,193 spent on gas.  And that’s just commuting.  According to the Federal Highway Administration, Americans drive an average of 13,476 miles per year.  Just  replacing half of your non-commute related trips with biking would result in a yearly saving of $475.

You can start your transition to bike commuting slow by combining biking with taking the train/bus or by investing in a bike rack and driving part of the way way and biking from there, this would be a good way to save on parking if you work in a downtown area.  I started doing this a couple summers ago and eventually realized that the whole bike/train/bike arrangement took more time than biking alone, so last summer spent a fair number of weeks biking 12 miles each way to work.

The other obvious remedy for the 15 mile commute issue is moving closer to your place of work, finding a job closer to you, negotiating a 4 day work week (at 10 hours per day) to cut one full day of commuting out of your schedule, or trying to negotiate the ability to work from home.  I currently have a 4 mile commute and find that it’s the perfect distance to get some exercise in the morning and afternoon but not so long that I dread biking it every day.

Bikes are good for your health.  Biking for one hour at 10 mph will burn 540 calories for a 167lb, 37 year old man, and this is a fair bit slower than bikers usually ride.  Assuming you were to live about 5 miles from your place of work, biking 9 months out of the year (accounting for weather and winter), you would end up biking 1800 miles!  That’s far!  Spending time at the gym is quite tedious, and costs money, so biking as a commute would allow you to get rid of that gym membership and make the most of your time.  At $40/month that would be a savings of $480 a year, enough saved to buy a quite nice used bike!

Biking is a great way to spend time with friends and get out into your community.  When you have friends that bike, biking to events becomes part of the socialization time.  Spending time with friends makes you happier than driving someplace by yourself.  Biking is also a fun way to people watch and get exercise on your own.  I biked 10 miles today around the lakes and saw five people I knew in the process which made me feel very connected to my community and left me with a big goofy grin on my face for the majority of my ride.

Bikes are good for the environment.  Looking at our previous calculations, we see that commuting by car by an average American burns 335 gallons per year, which results in the release of 6365lbs of carbon dioxide.  If we cut all of our car trips, including commuting, by half we could save 300 gallons of gas from being burned, 5,700lbs of carbon dioxide from being produced, and $1,070!

Biking places takes initiative, and hard work, and muscles, but there are so many benefits individually and for the environment that I consider it completely worth it, even if I do end up getting stuck in the occasional rainstorm.

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