Insourcing: Getting Off Your Ass and Doing Things Yourself (with Recipes!)

Insourcing is taking control of things that you normally pay someone else to do for you.  There are both hidden and obvious ways that you outsource things in your day-to-day life.  When you outsource, you usually have to pay much more for another person to do work for you.  Sure there are certain things that you will need a professional’s help with, but many things are just so ingrained into our way of life and way of thinking that we don’t consider how we could do them ourselves.  When you do things yourself you get to do them exactly how you want, you become more badass, and you save money in the process.

Grocery items are a huge way that people outsource.  You outsource when you buy prepackaged tortellini, hummus, granola, baked goods, bread, cereal, and many other items from the grocery store.  It’s hard to think of some of these things as being actual items that you could make for yourself because you’re so used to putting them into your grocery cart.

Granola is a good example.  One bag of prepackaged granola at Trader Joe’s costs $4.50, which equals about 4 small bowls of granola or $1.13 per bowl.  Making your own granola, though, with homemade granola mixed with raisins, slivered almonds, and cashew pieces works out to $7.02 for two full containers (the smaller of which is pictured).  The first container has lasted me 8 breakfasts already so assuming the other container will last for 6, that’s 14 breakfasts total for $0.50 each, and you don’t sacrifice anything.  Actually I think it’s tastier than the store bought kind, and baking granola at home makes your apartment smell amazing.  Here’s the recipe I used (adapted from chow.com):

3 cups rolled oats

3 tbsp brown sugar

¼ tsp kosher salt

½ tsp cinnamon

1/3 cup honey

¼ cup canola oil (or applesauce, for more clusters)

1 tsp vanilla

In a large bowl, mix oats, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon.  In another bowl mix honey, oil, and vanilla.  Dump honey mixture onto oats mixture and thoroughly combine, possibly using your hands.  Preheat the oven to 300 degrees (F) and lay out your granola on a baking sheet.  Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring halfway through.  After it has cooled, add in nuts or raisins or whatever you want.

It’s helpful just to notice what you eat regularly that is outsourced.  I eat these amazing sprouted grain Ezekiel bagels that I get from the Wedge, and they cost almost $1 per bagel.  But they’re a really quick and easy meal option and much tastier than bagels I’ve made on my own before.  I acknowledge that they’re outsourced and I still buy them, but at least I’ve considered it.  One way to save money on groceries is by intentionally buying things that are not outsourced.  Rice, oats, beans (especially dried, but I can’t quite figure out dried beans yet), flour, and other things are in a base form and are therefore cheaper than prepackaged pastas, salads, etc.  A snack of oatmeal is much cheaper than a snack of a cereal bar.  If you can buy more of these staple ingredients and use them as-is or make them into something better, you’re going to save money and probably be healthier because you won’t be consuming as many preservatives.

Certain services are very often outsourced.  People pay lots of money to have their hair cut, nails done, eyebrows (and other body parts) waxed, cars cleaned, food cooked, houses cleaned, clothing mended, items repaired, and so much more.  Every item on this list that you learn to do yourself builds up your knowledge repertoire and helps you save money and time for yourself and friends/family.  I’ve taken to having dinner parties for my friends recently to cut down on eating out costs.  It makes my grocery bill momentarily higher, but this is probably offset by dinners that I’m invited to by those same friends.

I’ve cut (and layered!) my own bangs for years now, and have decided to venture into the realm of cutting my own hair.  My first attempt was today, and it was a very small trim, but it turned out really well!  I think it looks even better now than after I got it cut last.  I did go on Amazon today to buy new haircutting scissors, hair clips, and combs but for a total of $33, it’s less than my usual $40 haircuts and I’ll make it back and more as long as this venture can allow me to skip one salon visit.  I’m hoping it will allow me to stop visiting the salon altogether, but the best part is that this way I won’t have to wait 3 months for a haircut and can instead trim it up anytime I want.  It’s scary but fun.  I’ve already offered a haircut of questionable quality to a friend to improve my skills and have been taken up on it.

Today I also made cleaning products.  Many cleaning products are toxic, so I’ve been making my own for years now.  Seventh Generation has some great, ethical, environmentally-friendly products but they are very expensive.  One jug of laundry detergent costs about $12.  I bought some Borax and a bar of soap to make my own for only $10 and the Borax will last for many more batches.  I used the recipe here using Dr. Bronner’s bar soap and my clothes came out smelling fresh and clean.  I couldn’t find washing soda, but you can make your own by baking baking soda on a cookie sheet at 400 degrees for an hour, just make sure to store the washing soda in an airtight container or it might revert back to baking soda.  I make my own all-purpose cleaners but I find that I just cannot cover up the smell of vinegar.  My yoga studio uses an amazing smelling cleaning spray for the mats, and I finally got it from them today.  This recipe is a bit expensive at the front end, since essential oils are expensive.  But it smells wonderful and can also be used as a laundry freshener.

1/3 cup vodka (you can use the cheap stuff here)

5 drops lavender oil

5 drops tea tree oil

2 drops lemon oil

Put all of the ingredients into a 16oz bottle and fill to the top.  Shake before use as the oil will separate.

I’m always asking myself, “What can I make instead of buy?”  There are so many things I’ve been able to start making and stop buying.  This saves money and in most cases is better of the environment too!  Insourcing is awesome, and doing things for yourself will make you feel awesome.  Also, having more money will make you feel awesome.  So go, be awesome.

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2 comments on “Insourcing: Getting Off Your Ass and Doing Things Yourself (with Recipes!)

  1. Pingback: Super Great Free Alternatives for Pretty Great Spendy Stuff | wind awake

  2. Pingback: Really, Do You Know Where that Food Came From? | wind awake

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