Putting Food on My Body: Making Personal Care Products

I’m really going to let my freak flag fly in this one.  First, let me preface by saying that I don’t think that my friends and family* perceive me to be a dirty hippie.  I appear to be a generally washed, groomed, and put-together grad school student, perhaps not as fancy as some since I have a penchant for blue v-neck shirts, black skinny jeans, and black canvas shoes.  I just don’t think that people look at me and think, “Man, she needs some SOAP!”  So with that noted, let me draw you into my magical world of making my own personal care products.

It doesn’t seem super necessary at first, right?  I mean deodorant, face wash, shampoo, lotion, and conditioner is everywhere.  You’ve bought and used them your whole life and you’ve never thought of doing things differently.  That’s what I’m for, folks, gonna shake up your mind just a little.

I like making my own personal care products because they’re cheaper, usually a minute fraction of the cost of store-bought products.  Also they’re healthier, all those polysyllabic names in shampoo ingredients can’t be good for you, right?  And I think they work at least as well as, and sometimes better than, store-bought alternatives.  Plus if you do it the way I do it, you’re making less waste since you can usually get many of the ingredients for these products in bulk.

Shampoo.  I’m doing the no poo thing.  It’s where you stop using shampoo, then start spacing hair-washings, to get to a place where your hair becomes naturally oil-balanced, perfect, shining, bouncing, and always well-behaved. These wonderful things have not happened yet, but I’ve seen drastic improvements in frizziness and head itchiness.  Plus I can now go a couple days between washes and I had been up until now, a religious every-day hair washer.

1 tablespoon baking soda

1 cup (8 oz) boiling water

3-4 drops of essential oil

Boil water (helps to keep the baking soda separate).  Put baking soda into a bowl.  Once water boils pour it over baking soda until well combined.  Allow to cool.  Add in essential oils as desired (I use tea tree which is good for itchy scalp/dandruff and lavender which is calming/nice smelling).  Pour into bottle.  To use: pour onto head and scrub in for a little longer than you would scrub in shampoo.  This recipe is for someone who usually would use shampoo.  Since it can be drying, if you don’t use shampoo too often you could try less baking soda maybe 2 tsp per cup.  I’m trying to cut down to wean myself off.

If you’re interested in a more shampoo-ish version, this is something you might try: http://www.crunchybetty.com/not-ready-for-no-poo-try-sorta-poo-with-coconut-milk-and-castille

Conditioner (sort-of): Apparently the acidity of the apple cider vinegar balances your hair when used after the baking soda.  This is what I use most often and it’s worked pretty well.

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 cup water

essential oils as desired

Combine water and vinegar and pour into bottle.  Add essential oils as desired.  The ACV smell will dissipate once your hair has dried (I can attest from experience) and supposedly if you add essential oils that smell will remain.

Leave-in conditioner: When I wash my hair I usually use a little of this on the ends after the ACV rinse and then rinse out lightly.  It can make your hair look a little greasy, but it’s good for dry ends.

12 oz water

essential oils

1 teaspoon honey

Boil water.  Combine with honey until well combined.  Allow to cool.  Add essential oils as desired.

Lotion: I use oil and essential oils to rub into my skin.  I’ve used olive oil (super oily) and newly acquired jojoba oil (super expensive) mixed with enough tea tree and lavender oil to smell pretty.  Apparently good, affordable oils are sweet almond and sesame.  I have yet to try them, but all four above oils can be found in bulk at my local co-op (the Wedge).

Face Wash (adapted slightly from here)

2 teaspoons castile soap

2 tablespoons vegetable glycerin

2 tablespoons water

1/2 cup olive oil

2 drops tea tree oil

2 drops lavender oil

Clean, empty bottle

Whisk ingredients together to combine well.  Tea tree oil is good for acne-prone skin as it has anti-bacterial properties.  The face wash will probably separate a bit (just some olive oil separating on the bottom) so make sure you put it in a bottle that seals well and will be easy to shake up.  This wash is a little oily, and doesn’t get your face squeaky clean, but the real dirty hippies out there will tell you that ‘like dissolves like’ and oil is actually great for cleaning your face.

Deodorant: The deodorant/antiperspirant I make can be found here. It’s a good tutorial with pics.  I think it works better than what I was using before, but granted that was the crystal stick and was a deodorant only.  Anyway this deodorant smells really pretty.  One commenter on a blog I read said that after using a similar recipe she smells good all the time and feels like she has ‘sunshine coming out of her pits.’  So you know, that could happen.

Disclaimer: For all of these there can be a ‘detox’ period, especially if your body is used to really intense detergents that get you squeaky clean.  Your hair and face might be slightly oilier, and your pits smellier, for a little while but it doesn’t last long!  If you can get through the detox period, you can totes do this.  Maybe start while you’re camping?  I don’t know, I believe in you.

Are you trying any all-natural homemade recipes?  What has your experience been?  If you’re interested in more recipes with more in-depth tutorials and such, check out crunchybetty.com.  That lady is super crunchy!

*With the exception of my mother.  She cannot stand any grease in my hair whatsoever.  I have actually come to prefer my hair a little dirty.

Integrating Exercise into Every Day

Here’s a confession: I used to have a gym membership.  I would shell out $58/mo for my YWCA membership to go work out on the same elliptical 3-4 times a week.  I’d sometimes take a yoga class.  I’d often lift weights.  I got in better shape, lost a little weight, but I NEVER enjoyed it.  I’d blast whatever peppy songs I’d been listening to lately on my iPod while I tried to forget about the fact that I was working out.  While I was doing this, I kept thinking, “This is it?  I’m going to have to waste 4-5 hours at the gym every week for the rest of my life?”  But I’m happy to tell you that this is not the case!  You do not need to be a slave to a gym that sucks up your money and time.

When I quit the gym something interesting happened: I stopped ‘working out,’ I got into better shape, and I enjoyed myself much more.  How?  I started integrating exercise into my everyday life and found that I get much more exercise than I did before, it’s more useful, and I actually enjoy it now.

Working out is boring.  There’s no way around it.  Working out, to me, is any individual activities that take place at a gym.  The sole intent of working out is to increase physical fitness, which is great.  I did it for 1.5 years.  While I enjoyed being more physically fit, I didn’t enjoy having to set aside time each week to spend at the gym plugging away on the elliptical machine and doing the same arm exercises.  It was so boring!

During the time I went to the gym, I biked quite a bit but never had to bike all that far.  I started discovering that biking can be an amazing useful tool to both get you places and serve as your exercise for the day.  Last summer I biked to work for several weeks, 12 miles each way, and was excited about the fact that I wouldn’t have to come home and go to the gym since that served as my exercise.

When I started grad school, I began biking 8 miles round trip 5 days a week.  I got in better shape, felt more fit, and saved time because my commute also counted as my exercise time.  The other part is that I enjoy biking outside; you get to look around and notice what people are doing and what’s happening in the neighborhood.  It’s much more interesting than staring at a wall in a gym.

Utilitarian exercise is also much more sustainable than recreational exercise.  Sure, I love to go for a sunny bike ride around the lake, go for a pleasant jog, or take a stroll downtown, but I don’t always have time to do those things.  On the other hand, I always need to get to school.  Biking is faster than taking the bus and allows me more flexibility in my schedule; therefore it is the obvious choice for school transportation.  Even when I’m not able to do recreational exercise for awhile, at least I’m still getting exercise, and usually a lot of it, because it is well integrated into my life.

I also don’t feel like I exercise all that much.  I do yoga about 5 times per week and I bike 30-50 miles per week, but it never feels like exercise.  When I bike places, it feels like I’m transporting myself while getting fresh air.  When I do yoga, it feels like a mindfulness practice that happens to move my body.  I sometimes think that I need to exercise more because I never register my physical activity as exercise; it’s simply what I do to get around or be happy.

It’s really hard to motivate yourself to do something several times every single week, especially when it’s not something you particularly enjoy.  Finding enjoyable exercise that can become well integrated into your life is a very positive way to ensure that even if you’re strapped for time, or tired, or cranky, you will still be getting the exercise that your body needs, probably without even thinking about it.  So how can you do this?  Get a bike.  Bike to the grocery store, to run errands, to work.  Walk to your friend’s house or to the library.  In the winter, go ice skating instead of sitting inside watching TV.  Spend time doing physically active things with friends: take a walk, go for a run, take a yoga class (hell teach each other yoga moves), climb a tree, or go rock climbing. Some of these things are free, which makes it a great way to be social while being frugal and healthy.

Once exercise is well ingrained into your life, you won’t even notice it’s there.  You’ll start exercising for recreation on top of for utilitarian purposes and become even healthier.  You’ll save time and money not going to a gym.  You’ll be sexier and more interesting.  I promise.

Voting With Your Dollars and Food Ethics

I’ve talked a fair amount on this blog already about frugality, health, and sustainability and the way all three of these concepts intersect.  Biking, I believe, is the epitome of this intersection.  Biking saves gas and car maintenance and repair costs, so is good for your wallet.  Biking is exercise that is easily adapted into your daily schedule, so it is a convenient and consistent way to be physically active and thus healthier.  Biking prevents CO2 from being released into the atmosphere by cars so is better for the environment than driving.  Biking is the best!  However, there are some situations in which these three concepts do not overlap as wonderfully, and where there are more items to consider when making decisions about what is best.  One of these is surrounding food.

Food is important.  Food is an expense that we all share and eating is an activity that we do every day (if we are fortunate and, say, not fasting for religious or other reasons).  Food consumes a large proportion of your budget and food is what makes your body!  Have you thought about that lately?  You put something in your mouth and by magical intestinal efforts your body takes out what is useful and integrates it into your being.  It’s easy to forget about this, as it is easy to forget that the food we eat comes from somewhere and, if we shop at mainstream grocery stores, likely has a less-than-ideal origin.

When you buy groceries from a big box grocery store like Rainbow, Cub, or Target the produce that you get has been treated with pesticides.  These are chemicals that are bad for people and bad for the environment.  Food grown with pesticides is acutely and chronically harmful for the farm workers who distribute the pesticides and work in areas where pesticides are used.  Many of these farm workers are paid very low wages due to migrant status and do not have the resources to address health issues that might arise.  Pesticides are bad for you too.  Acute exposure to pesticides can cause death, and long term exposure to pesticides (even in small doses!) can lead to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s as well as cancer and reproductive disorders.  Pesticides can harm local ecosystems by killing of beneficial microbes and bugs opening the door for invasive species to intrude.  Pesticides can travel far, contaminating drinking water sources.

Buying food from supermarkets often supports companies like ConAgra and Monsanto, which have been criticized and sued for their part in pollution and poisoning communities across the U.S.  They have been responsible for hosts of food recalls due to contaminated meat and other food.  They utilize antibiotics and growth hormones in meat to streamline operations while negatively affecting the public’s health.  They have been known to target and systematically eliminate family farms.

Every single thing you buy is a vote.  Let me say that again, every time you purchase something you are casting a vote of confidence for the way that product was manufactured, transported, and sold.  When you support supermarkets that are not committed to environmental sustainability and health, you are essentially telling them that you support the work that they do and you give them the money to keep doing it.

This makes it very important to consciously vote with your dollars.  Realize that your decisions contribute to the demand side of the supply and demand at the heart of our economic system.  How do you demand safe, healthy, ethical food?  Shop at co-ops, farmer’s markets, or purchase a CSA share.  Learn where your food comes from, how it was grown or raised, and who grew or raised it.  Food co-ops are usually worker owned, providing rewarding work opportunities for people in your community.  They often buy produce from local, organic farms and invest money back into the community in various ways through courses and education initiatives.  Farmer’s markets are great ways to skip the middle man and get to know your farmer and where your food came from.  A CSA is community shared agriculture, where you purchase shares of a farm at the beginning of a growing season and reap the benefits in weekly boxes of whatever your farm is producing that week.  All of these methods allow you to get closer to the production process and support healthy food and a healthy community.

There is a fundamental tension here for people who want to be frugal while still living in sustainable, environmentally ethical ways.  Organic, local food is more expensive than food from supermarkets and is often out of reach for many people.  There are various ways you can address this for yourself.  Buying in bulk and insourcing is a way to reduce your grocery bill in other areas so you can purchase what you need from places you support.  Utilizing farmer’s markets and CSAs are often cheaper options and allow you to get closer to your food source.  Planting your own food in your yard or a community garden is a great way to really get your hands dirty (literally!) and begin understanding what it means to produce food for yourself.

You may say, “I can’t afford to buy organic food or shop at a co-op,” but what you’re really saying is that you value other things more than your health and the health of the environment.  There are certainly people who cannot afford healthy, affordable food and this is an entirely different discussion of food justice, but having access to the internet and time to read this blog means that you likely are not one of these people.  Cutting down on spending in other areas will allow you to act upon your values by voting with your dollars.

Voting with your dollars doesn’t stop at food either.  Everything you buy supports something, you should do some research to find out what that is and then decide whether you’d like to continue supporting it.

In a capitalist economy, your money is your voice.  Spend it wisely.

Super Great Free Alternatives for Pretty Great Spendy Stuff

Being frugal is hard, and one thing that’s hard about it is that there are really ingrained ways in which money seems to seep right out of your bank account.  These manifest in expensive habits that all of us have.  I think my expensive habits are quite similar to many people in their 20s, and they mostly revolve around food/beverage consumption.  I spend a lot of money on groceries because eating in an environmentally sustainable and ethical way is really important to me.  In my last post I discussed insourcing which is a way I’m trying to cut down grocery spending while still being able to shop at the co-op.

However, a big chunk of my spending each month goes towards eating out, going out for drinks, and working or hanging out at coffee shops.  I don’t do each of these things very often, but when you add up how often I do all of them combined, it probably costs me around $100 or more per month.  I’ve come up with some surprisingly satisfying free or much cheaper alternatives for all three things above.

Eating out: My friends and I have taken to hosting dinner parties and inviting each other over for dinner or food-based get togethers.  Hosting get togethers can be expensive, but making sure to plan it ahead of time so you can delegate dishes for people to bring helps a lot.  Another good option is making these into potlucks, where everyone contributes a dish and it costs little more than eating at home.

Going out to eat usually is a limited venture with one or two other people.  When you begin hosting get togethers you end up socializing with more people at once which helps expand your social circle.

Coffee shops:  I love coffee shops.  I like to go to coffee shops to do homework, read, look at people, and just generally feel like I’m part of the community in which I live.  I’m a research assistant which means that the vast majority of my work hours happen by distance, meaning that I work from home or from coffee shops.  Since I realized how productive I can be when I work outside of my apartment, my coffee shop spending has increased.

I started thinking about what it is about coffee shops that I like: I like the atmosphere, I like the ability to focus, I like being in a situation where I could meet new people, and I like spending time at a place that isn’t my apartment.  Then it struck me, libraries.  Libraries are places where people can go to study, with the added benefit of being less busy and less loud than coffee shops so that productivity is likely to increase.  The only problem was that the U of M’s libraries don’t have the right atmosphere and the county libraries I’ve been to either don’t have the right atmosphere or are really busy and can get loud and crowded.  I decided to start researching smaller libraries within 3-4 miles of my apartment and visited the Linden Hills library about a week ago.  It’s 3.8 miles away and the bike route to the library takes me along Lake of the Isles and Lake Calhoun.  Linden Hills library is sunny, small, and quiet (I took a picture of it’s loveliness below) enough to really focus but not so quiet as to be unnerving.  Both of the times that I’ve worked there I’ve been incredibly productive, haven’t spent any money, and have had friendly conversations with other library patrons.

Going out on the town:  Sometime’s you’ve got to let loose.  Whether it be going out for drinks, going to a concert, going dancing, or whatever, spending time out at night with friends is a certainly satisfying way to pass a weekend.  But with drinks costing $3-$5 each and cover to dance nights or clubs, your nightly bill for going out on the town can easily surpass $20-$30.  Here are a couple of ways to decrease this spending.

  1. Free dance nights.  Haley and I biked to Hipshakers at the Kitty Kat Club on Thursday and had a wonderful free time.  There was no cover.  We drank only water and part of a free drink our friend was bought.  We shook our hips, talked, had a good time, and biked home happy and exhausted.
  2. Drinking at home.  Okay, pre-gaming is not the thing to do anymore.  But having some friends over for a couple glasses of wine before a night out is totally okay.  Then, when you’re out, you can just get water, or perhaps one cheap drink and you’ll save money and still not feel like you’re awkwardly sober in a sea of drunken people.
  3. Not drinking. While I really enjoy going out with friends, getting’ my groove thing on and all, waking up in the morning exhausted and tired from a late night out always makes me feel like the day is wasted.  Choosing only to drink one day on a weekend, or maybe one to two days a month, doesn’t mean you can’t go out with friends.  It means that you will just choose to drink water while you’re out with those friends.  At first, it might make them uncomfortable, but they’ll get over it quickly and might feel inspired enough to try the same strategy for themselves from time to time.

I feel very certain that the above things are not only good, frugal replacements, but that they are genuinely more satisfying options overall and will enhance my quality of life beyond just saving me money.

Insourcing: Getting Off Your Ass and Doing Things Yourself (with Recipes!)

Insourcing is taking control of things that you normally pay someone else to do for you.  There are both hidden and obvious ways that you outsource things in your day-to-day life.  When you outsource, you usually have to pay much more for another person to do work for you.  Sure there are certain things that you will need a professional’s help with, but many things are just so ingrained into our way of life and way of thinking that we don’t consider how we could do them ourselves.  When you do things yourself you get to do them exactly how you want, you become more badass, and you save money in the process.

Grocery items are a huge way that people outsource.  You outsource when you buy prepackaged tortellini, hummus, granola, baked goods, bread, cereal, and many other items from the grocery store.  It’s hard to think of some of these things as being actual items that you could make for yourself because you’re so used to putting them into your grocery cart.

Granola is a good example.  One bag of prepackaged granola at Trader Joe’s costs $4.50, which equals about 4 small bowls of granola or $1.13 per bowl.  Making your own granola, though, with homemade granola mixed with raisins, slivered almonds, and cashew pieces works out to $7.02 for two full containers (the smaller of which is pictured).  The first container has lasted me 8 breakfasts already so assuming the other container will last for 6, that’s 14 breakfasts total for $0.50 each, and you don’t sacrifice anything.  Actually I think it’s tastier than the store bought kind, and baking granola at home makes your apartment smell amazing.  Here’s the recipe I used (adapted from chow.com):

3 cups rolled oats

3 tbsp brown sugar

¼ tsp kosher salt

½ tsp cinnamon

1/3 cup honey

¼ cup canola oil (or applesauce, for more clusters)

1 tsp vanilla

In a large bowl, mix oats, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon.  In another bowl mix honey, oil, and vanilla.  Dump honey mixture onto oats mixture and thoroughly combine, possibly using your hands.  Preheat the oven to 300 degrees (F) and lay out your granola on a baking sheet.  Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring halfway through.  After it has cooled, add in nuts or raisins or whatever you want.

It’s helpful just to notice what you eat regularly that is outsourced.  I eat these amazing sprouted grain Ezekiel bagels that I get from the Wedge, and they cost almost $1 per bagel.  But they’re a really quick and easy meal option and much tastier than bagels I’ve made on my own before.  I acknowledge that they’re outsourced and I still buy them, but at least I’ve considered it.  One way to save money on groceries is by intentionally buying things that are not outsourced.  Rice, oats, beans (especially dried, but I can’t quite figure out dried beans yet), flour, and other things are in a base form and are therefore cheaper than prepackaged pastas, salads, etc.  A snack of oatmeal is much cheaper than a snack of a cereal bar.  If you can buy more of these staple ingredients and use them as-is or make them into something better, you’re going to save money and probably be healthier because you won’t be consuming as many preservatives.

Certain services are very often outsourced.  People pay lots of money to have their hair cut, nails done, eyebrows (and other body parts) waxed, cars cleaned, food cooked, houses cleaned, clothing mended, items repaired, and so much more.  Every item on this list that you learn to do yourself builds up your knowledge repertoire and helps you save money and time for yourself and friends/family.  I’ve taken to having dinner parties for my friends recently to cut down on eating out costs.  It makes my grocery bill momentarily higher, but this is probably offset by dinners that I’m invited to by those same friends.

I’ve cut (and layered!) my own bangs for years now, and have decided to venture into the realm of cutting my own hair.  My first attempt was today, and it was a very small trim, but it turned out really well!  I think it looks even better now than after I got it cut last.  I did go on Amazon today to buy new haircutting scissors, hair clips, and combs but for a total of $33, it’s less than my usual $40 haircuts and I’ll make it back and more as long as this venture can allow me to skip one salon visit.  I’m hoping it will allow me to stop visiting the salon altogether, but the best part is that this way I won’t have to wait 3 months for a haircut and can instead trim it up anytime I want.  It’s scary but fun.  I’ve already offered a haircut of questionable quality to a friend to improve my skills and have been taken up on it.

Today I also made cleaning products.  Many cleaning products are toxic, so I’ve been making my own for years now.  Seventh Generation has some great, ethical, environmentally-friendly products but they are very expensive.  One jug of laundry detergent costs about $12.  I bought some Borax and a bar of soap to make my own for only $10 and the Borax will last for many more batches.  I used the recipe here using Dr. Bronner’s bar soap and my clothes came out smelling fresh and clean.  I couldn’t find washing soda, but you can make your own by baking baking soda on a cookie sheet at 400 degrees for an hour, just make sure to store the washing soda in an airtight container or it might revert back to baking soda.  I make my own all-purpose cleaners but I find that I just cannot cover up the smell of vinegar.  My yoga studio uses an amazing smelling cleaning spray for the mats, and I finally got it from them today.  This recipe is a bit expensive at the front end, since essential oils are expensive.  But it smells wonderful and can also be used as a laundry freshener.

1/3 cup vodka (you can use the cheap stuff here)

5 drops lavender oil

5 drops tea tree oil

2 drops lemon oil

Put all of the ingredients into a 16oz bottle and fill to the top.  Shake before use as the oil will separate.

I’m always asking myself, “What can I make instead of buy?”  There are so many things I’ve been able to start making and stop buying.  This saves money and in most cases is better of the environment too!  Insourcing is awesome, and doing things for yourself will make you feel awesome.  Also, having more money will make you feel awesome.  So go, be awesome.

Why Biking is All Sorts of Healthy

Last Monday I got a new bike, my first road bike, it’s so great.  I don’t have a picture of it yet but found a picture online that is very similar, it’s posted above, isn’t it pretty?  I love bikes for all sorts of reasons which relate to the ways in which bikes make you healthier.  The thing I like most about bikes is that they’re pretty much accessible to everyone.  Minneapolis has a plethora of used bike shops, including the Hub Bike Co-op which is my favorite and where I bought my new bike for $250.  Bikes that’ll get you around can be found on Craigslist.  My old roommate used a $20 bike from Craigslist to commute for years.  Minneapolis has the NiceRide system which allows you to rent bikes from kiosks all over the city for commuting and recreation and the fees are $55/year for students and $65/year for everyone else.  This means that for all of the reasons I’m about to discuss, biking is a feasible way to embody your attitude about sustainability, frugality, and heath.

Bikes save you money.  Mr. Money Mustache did a great job of discussing all of the potential and theoretical ways in which bikes could save you money, but I’m going to get a bit more realistic.  Let’s calculate the average amount of fuel burned and money spent for an average American commute in a year.  To do this we’ll have to Google some things:

  • In 2009, the EPA reported that the average fuel economy in America reached 22.4 mpg.
  • The average commute in America is 15 miles.
  • Gas was $3.56 per gallon on average in 2011.

Driving to work every weekday for a year (50 weeks, accounting for some vacation time) at 30 miles/day in a 22.4 mpg car will result in 7,500 miles driven, 335 gallons of gas burned, and $1,193 spent on gas.  And that’s just commuting.  According to the Federal Highway Administration, Americans drive an average of 13,476 miles per year.  Just  replacing half of your non-commute related trips with biking would result in a yearly saving of $475.

You can start your transition to bike commuting slow by combining biking with taking the train/bus or by investing in a bike rack and driving part of the way way and biking from there, this would be a good way to save on parking if you work in a downtown area.  I started doing this a couple summers ago and eventually realized that the whole bike/train/bike arrangement took more time than biking alone, so last summer spent a fair number of weeks biking 12 miles each way to work.

The other obvious remedy for the 15 mile commute issue is moving closer to your place of work, finding a job closer to you, negotiating a 4 day work week (at 10 hours per day) to cut one full day of commuting out of your schedule, or trying to negotiate the ability to work from home.  I currently have a 4 mile commute and find that it’s the perfect distance to get some exercise in the morning and afternoon but not so long that I dread biking it every day.

Bikes are good for your health.  Biking for one hour at 10 mph will burn 540 calories for a 167lb, 37 year old man, and this is a fair bit slower than bikers usually ride.  Assuming you were to live about 5 miles from your place of work, biking 9 months out of the year (accounting for weather and winter), you would end up biking 1800 miles!  That’s far!  Spending time at the gym is quite tedious, and costs money, so biking as a commute would allow you to get rid of that gym membership and make the most of your time.  At $40/month that would be a savings of $480 a year, enough saved to buy a quite nice used bike!

Biking is a great way to spend time with friends and get out into your community.  When you have friends that bike, biking to events becomes part of the socialization time.  Spending time with friends makes you happier than driving someplace by yourself.  Biking is also a fun way to people watch and get exercise on your own.  I biked 10 miles today around the lakes and saw five people I knew in the process which made me feel very connected to my community and left me with a big goofy grin on my face for the majority of my ride.

Bikes are good for the environment.  Looking at our previous calculations, we see that commuting by car by an average American burns 335 gallons per year, which results in the release of 6365lbs of carbon dioxide.  If we cut all of our car trips, including commuting, by half we could save 300 gallons of gas from being burned, 5,700lbs of carbon dioxide from being produced, and $1,070!

Biking places takes initiative, and hard work, and muscles, but there are so many benefits individually and for the environment that I consider it completely worth it, even if I do end up getting stuck in the occasional rainstorm.

The Art of Making Do

This article will explore the careful assessment of minor disasters in order to cut costs and clutter.

How many times has something you own broken?  Hundreds of times?  Thousands?  I wonder what it would look like if we could follow the pathways of all of these broken toys, clothes, tools, and utilities.  What percent do you think were fixed, and what percent ended up in the trash?  I’d bet that in the vast majority of each of our experiences broken items end up relegated to the realm of garbage to be swiftly replaced.  I’m here to advocate something different and it starts with one important thing: patience.

Cultivating patience is hard.  In our society it is so easy to find whatever you need on a whim without any further thought or contemplation.  Patience requires mindfulness, and mindfulness in all things is difficult.  Being present and putting thought into our predicaments, however small, will eventually bring us more peace and wellbeing than giving in to our every fleeting desire.  If we approach these situations with patience, we can teach ourselves a few lessons:

First, we will increasingly value what was broken.  When my iPod recently broke, I missed the presence of portable music in my life dearly.  I spent a week missing my favorite tunes in the shower and found my morning routine to be missing its jubilant soundtrack.  I spent time on the bus staring out the window missing the ability to actually listen to the song that was bouncing around in my head.  Luckily my dad doesn’t often use his so he let me borrow it for a couple of months until I get an iPhone for my birthday.

Second, we will assess the impact of discarding the item on ourselves and the environment.  Mending clothes, fixing broken electronics, and generally favoring “reusing” instead of “replacing” is healthier for the environment on two ends.  Materials are not being harvested to make whatever will be replacing the broken item and the broken item will not take up space in a landfill and (in the case of some electronics) poisoning the environment as it does so.

Third, we will have an opportunity to ask for help.  Asking for help is so underrated.  When you ask for help, you bind yourself with whomever you are asking.  It can make you very thankful for their generosity and give you something important to share with that person.  Asking to borrow something frequently unused will often be met with generosity.  A good friend posted on Facebook this fall that her apartment was freezing so I gladly offered up a spare space heater.  Sure there are times I would have liked to use it this winter but knowing it was keeping her warm in her drafty apartment more than made up for the loss.

Fourth, you’ll find ways to purge your life of unneeded things.  When I had an iPad, iPod, smart phone, and computer I would sometime pile them on top of each other and feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of electronic internet-accessing devices that I owned.  Since I sold my iPad and my iPod broke, I’ll have the opportunity to simplify my life into having one computer and one phone/music player.

Fifth, it will give you time to shop around and make the best financial decision to remedy your situation.  I have become much pickier as to what items I am interested in purchasing in the last year.  I once would buy clothes or other goods because they were the only things available.  When you are able to be mindfully patient, you can wait until you find the perfect fit for your needs, meaning that there will likely be less waste and less clutter in the end.

And sixth, it will allow you to develop skills in fixing broken things.  Self-efficacy is wonderful and learning how to fix and mend things make you feel more efficacious and capable.  The only thing better than figuring out how to fix something on your own is inviting over a knowledgeable friend who can teach you while socializing and drinking beer.

The next time a button pops off of a favored shirt, your lampshade gets a tear, or any number of breakages happen in your life, take a moment to reflect mindfully and cultivate some patience.  Even if you do go out and buy a new ice cream scoop right away, at least you’ll have concluded that the absence of an ice cream scoop from your life was too big a loss to bear.  Then the next time you’re scooping some Oreo ice cream, you’ll be grateful.

Time is counting down until you need to plug your laptop in!

Why I Like My Computer’s Terrible Battery Life

There’s nothing like the thrill of hearing the sweet chirp of your computer’s battery monitor telling you that you have three minutes until your computer completely shuts down due to a drained battery.  I’ve heard this chirp often lately.  It’s hard to tell if my computer’s battery life is getting worse, or if I’m just using it in charger-less situations more frequently.  Either way, my computer’s battery lasts for 1.5 hours maximum, and usually less.  That chirping noise is supposed to happen when I have 10% battery left, and for some reason is often delayed until I have 5% battery life left, which functionally means that the chirp will happen quite belatedly after my computer has died and been turned back on after being plugged in.

So you would ask why, why would I possibly like this lovely feature?  There are three reasons.

First, the computer that I have has worked splendidly.  It’s an Acer Aspire 5532.  When I bought it brand-new from Best Buy in May of 2010 it was less than $400 including tax.  Sure it doesn’t have a web cam, but my old computer didn’t either so I already had one.  Yes it only has two USB drives, but that’s enough for filling up my external hard drive, so good enough for me.  It has a 17” screen which is fantastic for watching the Daily Show and the other various videos that one might watch online (ie. Baby Sloths).  It’s not bad looking either.

Sure, sometimes I get somewhat jealous of people who have MacBook Pros or iMacs, but there is no way that I could ever justify such a purchase.  Let’s assume that people replace their computers every 4 years.  My <$400 17” screen Acer will average out to less than $100/year, while a $1799 15”MacBook Pro will average $479/year (after tax) and a $1199 13” MacBook Pro will average $319/year (after tax).  Even considering the fact that MacBooks have greater resale value, a brief Ebay search indicates that a 4-year-old 15” MacBook Pro can resell for an average of $780, which still results in a yearly loss of $284.  I understand that some people do interesting things with their computers, but I don’t and I know that the vast majority of friends and acquaintances with MacBooks use their computers for the same things as I do: listening to iTunes, writing Word documents, checking Facebook obsessively, Googling things, Wikipediaing things, Youtubing things. Which brings me to my next point:

Second, a crappy battery life is an amazing way to meet people at coffee shops.  If you frequent coffee shops that have ubiquitous electrical outlets, this does not apply as much.  But if you, like me, enjoy independent and local coffee shops with sporadic electrical outlet placement, having a computer with poor battery life provides you with a great excuse to speak with that cute guy or girl sitting next to the nearest outlet.

For example, one day I was at Espresso Royale in Dinkytown, a place infamous for its lack of outlets.  I was working away on grading some undergrad discussion forum posts when my computer died without even chirping first.  I spent several minutes with computer cord in hand wandering the coffee shop, seeking an elusive outlet.  The only one I could find was at a two-person table where a fellow was sitting by himself, working away on his own laptop.  I asked if I could share his table and outlet, and he willingly obliged.  This fellow, Jesse, was very friendly and the entire endeavor was quite satisfying.  We chatted, worked, and watched each other’s computers while the other went to smoke (him) or went to refill a water bottle (me).

This is not necessarily just a tactic for those who are single and looking.  There’s something about having a connection with community that has become more and more important to me as I’ve been learning to navigate the world on my own.  While being in grad school has blessed me with an abundance of lovely friends and acquaintances, many of them will someday move away and I’ve been especially aware of possibilities for meeting new friends once this happens (and before!).

Third, I’ve been trying to spend my time a lot more wisely lately.  I try to do some sort of physical activity every day, usually including at least one hour of yoga and some running or biking.  I’ve found that both meditating for 20 minutes every morning and being physically active make my mind more able to focus on work or homework that I might need to finish, which makes me overall more productive than if I had forgone the physical activity and meditation and tried to spend all of that time working.  One of the major features of this new lifestyle trend has been to cut down the time I spend online.  When your computer unexpectedly dies or starts chirping that it is about to, you are able to assess what you’re doing and evaluate whether that activity warrants the retrieval of a power cord to continue.  In many situations I realize that what I’m doing (watching the Colbert report, re-reading Mr. Money Mustache blog posts, looking at friends pictures on Facebook) isn’t something that I really want to spend more time doing, so I leave my computer dead or plug it in and turn it off.  Having this time limit helps me be more productive and provides a great reminder for times when the internet sucks me in.

Having a great computer battery life is probably a necessity for some people, but I’ve found that the monetary as well as unexpected social and personal benefits from a poor battery life are not insignificant for me.

How to Read This Blog

I suggest you wake up.  I suggest you open your window and stretch your arms high above your head.  I suggest you sit down at your computer with a hot beverage, being careful not to spill on your keyboard.  You spilled that one time and man, did that turn out poorly.  I suggest you settle in.

I have one many-faceted intention: it is health, mine and yours and the health of the environment.   I want us all to be physically, mentally, emotionally, financially, socially, and spiritually healthy.  I have found that these intentions have interesting intersections in the world.  Finding ways to further more than one goal at once makes me (and hopefully will make you) happy.  Happiness, too, is important.

So this blog will suggest that you wake up.  Wake up to the ways in which how you act and live affect your life detrimentally.  Wake up to being alive and present, to being healthier and happier, to acknowledging the effect you have on the world around you and taking responsibility for your actions.  Wake up to a new way of thinking about the world, placing much less value on things and much more value on health: your physical health, the health of your relationships, your financial health, and the health of the environment.